Mennonite Girls Can Cook 

Lovella Schellenberg 
  • Leader 
  • Web site administrator
  • Media contact
  • Tweets our daily recipes to Twitter
Anneliese Friesen
  • Lepp Farm Market Cooking Class Contact and Planner
  • First responder on this contact page
Betty Reimer
  • Recipe Schedule Reminder
Bev Klassen
  • Recipe Indexer.
Charlotte Penner
  • Forwards your comments to us.
Ellen Bayles
  • Posts the daily recipe to Facebook.
Judy Wiebe




  • Pins the daily recipe to Pinterest
  • Lepp Farm Market Cooking Class Contact and Planner


  • Julie Klassen
    • First responder to Prayer Request Line
    Kathy McLellan
    • Sponsorship Contact
    Marg Bartel
    • Bread for the Journey administrator
    • Sponsorship Contact



    199 comments:

    1. How do I leave you my e-mail address without it becoming public?

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      1. With comment moderation on, we do not publish comments with personal information such as an email address.

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    2. Wondering if you know where I can buy gluten free flours in the abbotsford bc area? Thank you

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      1. When I lived in Abbotsford, I found the best place to buy GF flours was at Alderhealth in Aldergrove. I was soo happy when we moved to Chilliwack to find Sardis Healthfood Store (might be worth the trip if you are planning to stock up) You can find some gf flours in most grocery stores now but I prefer to buy mine where they specialize in gf flours/baking supplies.
        I have also been pleased with my experience ordering online from Authentic Foods.

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    3. As I live abroad and don't have recipe books in my kitchen, I rely on the Internet. Thank you for your recipes, and your attention to presentation. You express enjoyment of preparing food, of feeding your families good food, and of sharing what you have. As Mennonites (I am as well) hospitality is a major part of our theology, and shared meals are a part of that. Thank you for keeping that before us! Lois

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      1. Thank you for you kind note! May God bless you in your ministry.

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    4. Where can I purchase the lovely aprons that you are wearing in your cookbook?

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      1. We do not sell the aprons, however there are some ladies at the Steinbach Mennonite Museum who sew them. If you would like to contact them, here is the website http://www.steinbachonline.com/community/mhv/2012/05/18/mennonite-girls-can-cook-aprons/

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    5. What about the aprons from the celebrations cookbook?

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      1. Here is the information about the pattern. Perhaps you can find someone to sew one for you. http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2013/06/apron-recipe-for-celebrations-book.html

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    6. HI! My name is Laurel. I love your website and books. Trying the recipes on my own bring back a lot of wonderful memories. I am looking a recipe for blueberry moos. My aunt made it many years ago and I remember really enjoying as a young girl. But I can't find the recipe anywhere. I have made plumi moos many times but I can't figure out how to adapt it for blueberries. Any help would be appreciated. Would really like to make use of the beautiful blueberries we had this year!

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      1. You may want to try replacing the gooseberries with bluebrries in this recipe.
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2008/07/charlottes-gooseberry-moos.html
        Personally, I have made a thin vanilla custard and added fruit to that, but I have not tried blueberries.

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    7. Where can I purchase baking ammonia? My grandmother used to make little white cookies that I remember fondly. Would love to try and make some. Thanks for your help.

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      1. I have purchased it it at the Pharmacy at Safeway. Also, I see that amazon.com has it in stock. http://www.amazon.com/Ammonium-Carbonate-Bakers-Ammonia-2-7/dp/B005GLXRC6

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    8. I just want to thank you all for this awesome website---you've been a lifesaver! We had a house fire caused by a lightning strike on Sept 3rd and most of my recipes were destroyed in the fire---except my Mennonite Girls Can Cook cookbook! But it's getting cleaned at the restoration company, so I don't have it on hand. Everytime I go to bake something, I realize----oh right, I don't have that recipe. So thanks to you, I can come here and find most of what I'm looking for and trying new recipes in the process! THANKYOU!!
      Blessings to you all
      Ellie
      Sorrento, BC

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      1. Ellie,
        First of all, I am so sorry your home was devastated in a fire! Thank you for this encouraging comment. When we complied these recipes we wondered who would appreciate them as much as we do and who would truly need recipes besides the ones mothers and grandmothers have handed down. Since that time, emails and comments have taught us that there are many reasons why someone might need a cookbook like ours. Every story is unique and many like yours are a blessing to all of us.
        All the best to you as you continue the process of rebuilding your home.

        Thank you!
        Lovella

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    9. Hello ladies! There are two recipes circulating on Pinterest that I wonder if you are considering making in the future? They are similar except the Polish version uses baking powder. The are Cream Puff Cake and the Polish version is Karpatka (also known as Carpathian Mountain Cream Cake) - both use choux pastry with vanilla pudding filling.- I always look to you as my Test Kitchen and that's why everything I have made from your books and this website never fail!!! God bless, and many, many thanks! MJ in Nova Scotia

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      1. We do have one version on the blog here http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2011/04/cream-puff-dessert.html It looks and sounds much like what you describe. I noticed this can also be done in a round cake pan and cut open like a large cream puff,
        to fill. You have me wanting to try this!

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    10. My husband loves the Peppermint Cookies by Anneliese. They turned out well for me last Christmas, so when I was making them this year I made a double batch. Evidently, I'd forgotten exactly what 12-14 dozen cookies looks like volume-wise, and after filling 2 4-L pails, I still have lots of dough left. Does it work to freeze this dough?

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      1. Olive, I'm glad you like them! I have never frozen the dough, but I don't see why not.
        That is a lot of cookies!

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    11. Good morning! Thank you for an amazing recipe site....my only "beef" is that when I try to review a recipe most of the comments are not reviews at all but comments like "oh, I will have to try this at our next dinner", etc. Is there any way you could mention that most recipe sites have helpful comments that guide us in the preparation of the recipe. I find it very frustrating to check the reviews and not find any. The comments are not reviews at all but just friendly chat. thanks!

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      1. Lynda, we agree with your "beef" by saying that it really would be nice to have more comments coming from people who have tried the recipe. Reviews/comments can and should be helpful to other readers. In saying that, we do not want to discourage the ones who have commented. The times readers have taken the time to come back and write a review have been much appreciated, but it does take an effort that we cannot always expect.
        I don't think our readers really know how much the comments and reviews encourage us and benefit other readers. To be honest, sometimes we wonder why we go through all of the effort to have four people say it looks good . . . but those four people deserve thanks, as well, for saying something and letting us know that the recipe was looked at. =)

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    12. Hello everyone!

      I recently lost my beloved grandmother to cancer, and after all was said and done, I got the only item I truly wanted from her estate - her pasta maker. While I was growing up, she would make us giant garbage bags full of her dried noodles, that could be used for any kind of pasta dish, especially home made chicken noodle soup. Her noodles were delicious, both dry and cooked. My brother and I would sit in our pantry as children and eat the noodles straight out of the bag, uncooked - that is how awesome they were! For many years, she rolled the dough and cut these noodles by hand and it would take her days to fill a garbage bag until someone in the family bought her the pasta maker. She was thrilled and she put that machine to good use over the next several years. I haven't had Oma's noodles for years, but I sure wish I could match her recipe and start creating them myself now.
      I did not get a chance to see my grandmother before she died or ask her for her recipe for those noodles. She lived in Coaldale, AB and so far no one in the family nor her friends have found a recipe from her, so I am hoping someone here would be able to provide one that would work in a pasta machine and hopefully taste like my Oma's noodles. Any kind of pointers on how to get started would also be helpful. I have never done this before and I'm excited to try it, but really not sure what to start with.
      I live in southern Georgia USA, so a lot of the products we had in Canada are not necessarily available here. (asking for dry cottage cheese for perogies/vereniki makes people look at you funny down here), so I have to think about substitutes in the event I cannot find what a recipe in Canada, especially a Mennonite recipe, would call for.
      I look forward to the suggestions and possible recipes from you and hope to have a success story to share in the near future. Thank you in advance for taking the time to read my request. God bless you!

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      1. Hi Karen,
        Lovella has a recipe for noodles here http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2009/01/klissen-or-kielke-or-noodles.html
        and Marg had a tutorial on her personal blog here http://www.margs-home-again.com/2012/03/noodle-tutorial.html
        As for thickness or how thin your grandmother cut her noodles, you will remember and can work with that. It could be she never wrote down her recipe. that is how our grandmothers were. They went by memory and when we asked them how they make something, there were never exact amounts. It all depended on what they had available and how the dough felt. Too bad you could not get her personal tips. Wish you all the best!

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    13. I thought you girls at MGCC would like to hear my little story. At Christmas, I gave Celebrations to my friend Diane. (I had given her the first book on her birthday last January and had given myself both books as soon as they came out. I LOVE them!)
      Anyway, as soon as she opened it Diane said we should try some of the recipes and have people over. (She's always getting me in over my head!) We decided to go against the conventional wisdom of not trying new recipes for the first time with guests, and made a plan. We decided to have a once-a-month dinner with each of us choosing a guest 'guinea pig" couple and alternating between our 2 homes. Ground rules were that we had to only use recipes from the MGCC book and we couldn't practice them beforehand. It seemed like a fun plan right up until the housework for hosting the first event hit me! Anxiety!
      Last Sunday evening was the first dinner party at my house. I fixed the main course and salad and Diane had the bread and dessert. We had Sirloin Stroganoff and Green Bean and Feta Salad, Honey Bran Buns and Pies in Jars. It was a huge success (although I admit there were some nerve-wracking moments along the way!) Everyone really loved the taste and the recipes all turned out fine. I was surprised how very tender the stroganoff meat was.
      As this month's hostess I sent out the invitations to what we called our "Take a Risk Dinner". One friend RSVPed that her husband was not really very risk-taking when it came to food, and he was worried about coming in case we had sushi or something! It was that same guy who raved about the green bean and feta salad and said it was one of the top 3 salads he'd ever had and he would like to have it gain, and that he was not normally a 'salad guy'! Every seemed to really enjoy it all. The 2 guest couples got acquainted with each other and we all got to know each other better. My husband had thought up some "He said, She said" questions and we had a lot of laughs while sharing in the group.
      One funny thing that happened was when I was grocery shopping. Several of the ingredients were new to me. I had never bought sun dried tomatoes packed in oil, or fresh thyme, or kosher salt, or kalamata olives, or leeks. I wasn't even positive what a leek looked like. I asked the produce man if what I had was right, and it was, but it was tied in a bundle of 3. I said to him, "I only need one large one; what'll I do with the other 2? He said in one word, "Repeat!" I got quite a laugh out of that. (Actually, I am trying another new recipe, cream of leek soup.)
      I wished I'd had a video tutorial when I was making the salad dressing because grinding up the tomatoes and garlic and all the other ingredients made kind of a brown-looking mess. I probably over-blended it. I was worried about even using it, but it really tasted and smelled great. Another problem was how to add the olive oil in a constant stream while the blender was still running. Do you know what happens when you lift the knob out of the lid while the blender is running?!! I do!
      I thought you would be glad to hear how your book is really encouraging us to be hospitable and more adventurous in our food fixing. Our friends stayed until late in the evening and seemed to enjoy themselves. Diane and I compared notes on what worked and what we would do a little differently but we all went home very satisfied and happy with the good outcome! I woke up Monday morning feeling very happy with what a great time we had had. So, thank you for your encouragement, MGCC! On to our "Take A Risk Dinner" in February!
      Holly
      P.S. I particularly like all the family stories and personal history you share in both your books. I enjoy just reading them and looking at the beautiful photos, regardless of the recipes. Thank you for all your work on them.

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      1. Hollace - THANK YOU for the great story - I loved it and I know all the girls will agree with me. I love your idea of "Take a Risk" dinners and I'm so glad you stepped out and entertained in this way. Inviting people into your home - whether you serve take out pizza or a MGCC inspired dinner - is the best way to build solid and lasting friendships. God bless you and Diane as you spur each other on to building relationships with new people and as you try new recipes.

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      2. Hollace, we enjoyed reading about how you are using the new recipes in the cookbook! Your dinner experience will be remembered for a long time by your lucky guests and maybe inspire continued hospitality. We have to smile, because, with the risk, you have an excuse if the dinner does not turn out . . . but hope all of your experiments turn out great! Love the idea and how you are using it! All the best on your February Take a Risk Dinner!

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      3. Dear MGCC. I am Holly"s friend Diane who is the partner in the fun event. I just thought I would add that our husbands have been very helpful and good natured to do this with us, they are way out of their comfort zone in doing this once a month with us. (they like meat and potatoes and no fancy stuff). This Friday is our second dinner, and I changed the invite from "Take a Risk Dinner" to. "new friends and old friends" getting together to have a great time. I had one lady RSVP and asked if we were going to "sell something" at this dinner. That's why I changed the invite.
        Diane

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    14. I would like to thank you ladies for this wonderful cookbook. So many recipes to share with my children. Prior to your book I had my great grandmothers book from her church that she used. Even with the tips I learned from both grandmas I couldn't get anything right. Since they are not with us anymore I had no where to turn for guidance. You have written the recipes in such a foolproof way that I can now succeed! The wonderful memories of being in the kitchen with Nana from all the tastes and smells. Thankyou

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      1. From all of us, Alicia, you are welcome! It is so rewarding to read these kind of stories. May your special family memories continue to be passed on.

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    15. Thank you so much for your wonderful email "newsletter" recipes! And I especially enjoy Bread for the Journey! Such a blessing!

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    16. Do you have a recipe for home-made egg noodles?

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      1. Hi Cheryl, Here is a recipe called Kielke for you to try. It is found in the Mennonite recipe section of our blog. http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2009/01/klissen-or-kielke-or-noodles.html

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    17. Hi there,, I love your web site…its my go to.. I've looked for a recipe for something my mother made all the time.. We called it pay-pa-nate in low german.. it was little brown fingers baked side by side with lots of course sugar on top ..They tasted like they had cinnamon and nutmeg maybe molasses or chocolate to make it so brown and must have had a bit of yeast maybe or maybe not. They did raise slightly while baking. They were baked in a cookie sheet and they all were stuck together and you could just break a finger off and run away with it..lol I wonder if anyone would know what I'm talking about and if there is a recipe for this?
      Thank you ladies for all your work.. Trudy Schellenberg Parker

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    18. Hi Trudy, Yes we know the cookies ... your spelling sounds just the way you say it in Low German. In High German they are called Pfeffernuesse or in English Peppenuts. They are usually made at Christmas. There is a recipe in the first cookbook and a few on the blog. Maybe check this one
      http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2009/12/pfeffernusse.html

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    19. Hi, Girls. I've recently been introduced to you, and already I'm addicted! What a beautiful site, and what beautiful stories you tell! Most important, your foundation is Jesus Christ! Actually, there is none other.
      Two weeks ago I bought your Celebrations cookbook. I devoured it, read every word in it, and perused every picture with a magnifying glass in one afternoon. I told everyone I had changed my name and couldn't tell them my new name--so I could sit in peace with my treasure!
      Now--I want to know where I might purchase the beautiful tray that is pictured on pages 46 and 178-179 of the Celebrations book. It's gorgeous! I do LOTS of tea parties, mostly as a ministry with ladies one-on-one. It's not like I don't have many tea trays, but I think this one would be a lovely addition to my collection. I will appreciate any information or sources you can supply.
      Thank you so very much, and may God continue to use you ladies in a bold way to further His kingdom.

      A public answer is fine.
      kjgatlin@gmail.com

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      1. Hi there! It is so nice to hear from a new friend. Thank you for all your encouraging words. We appreciate it more than you know.
        Now.. about the tray. I bought it probably about 3 years ago at a Winners/Marshall's type store. I'm not even sure now which one it was. I think if you keep your eyes open you will probably find something similar. I love it too and often use it especially in summer.
        Blessings..

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    20. How lucky was I to have found your website!!
      I'm of Ukrainian descent, both parents from Winnipeg but found each other here in north-central Ontario and oh, goodness, the memories your recipes brought back for me! My Mother and her friends were incredible cooks and bakers and I've carried on the tradition with our children, and now our grandson will be the lucky little guy who will have his first slice of Paska this Easter! I found your site through a search for 'bread machine paska', so although Lovella's recipe doesn't use a breadmachine, I'll go with my Kitchenaid this year and try her recipe as opposed to the "Allrecipe" one I used last year. It turned out beautifully, but was lacking something..now I know! The orange (and lemon?) zest and flavour! Thank you! My Mom always added golden raisins so I also add them...what's tradition if one doesn't follow in Mom's footsteps, right? :) My Godmother also made a poppyseed roll that I never got her recipe for, but I found one here and I'm betting it's like hers!!
      Thank you for a lovely and loving, soft place to land.
      Easter Blessings to everyone!...Linda

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    21. I am so happy to have found this! I moved from Winkler in 2013 to South Carolina, and have started to really crave wareneki and kielke. I stumbled across these recipes today, and am so excited to make these foods I am missing! Thank you!

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    22. I enjoy your site so much but I sure wish you had a "search" feature. I remembered a recipe that I think I saw a few years ago on your site and came to look for it but noticed that you do not have a "search" feature. Any plans to add one? Thanks for all the great recipes.
      Shauna

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      1. Shauna, I'm sorry you have not seen the search button on the sidebar. It's near the top.

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    23. We need your advice badly. Living in an area where the nearest gluten free store Is two hours away and absolutely No gluten free bakeries anywhere. It seems a great idea to make our own Gluten Free foods and hopefully supliment My meager disability check while realizing the dream of having a Gluten free Bakery so direly needed in this area. Before trying for the loan to open ( and that will be hard) we need to know what BRAND NAME flours to use to bake with. Cakes, bread, pastries , cupcakes . Never having a second chance for a first impression, the taste of grand opening ( Lord Willing) week Food will make us ir break us. If you would recommend the Brand Names you feel are the absolute best you know of that's what I'll try. Even if bakery remains a dream the reality of cooking for a family of both gluten intolerant and normal ( lol) members is a daily necessity and thus far a trial. Please help with your personal Faveorite brand names ? Thank you and God Bless you and your works. Ps. Success or failure you are held Harmless in sharing you personal preferences. Thanks in advance for Any help. Jim richardson

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      1. Hello Jim. I'm sorry that we cannot really help you with brand names as only one of us cooks gluten free and she likes to make her own mix. From my observation all I can say is that GF baking is a trial and error kind of thing. I would suggest you try some brands and see what works well for you. Maybe from that you can come up with your own favorite mix. All the best in your new endeavour.

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      2. Hi Jim, Anneliese is right, I do mix my own flour blends, but I still have to buy the gluten free flour and in the individual flours there is not that much difference in brands. If you want to order online then I have found Kinnikkinnick or Authentic Foods very good. Bob Red Mills is another company that has a wide variety of flours that I trust.
        Only Oats is the brand I use for gf oats.
        I like to add white bean flour (small navy beans that can be bought at any grocery store) in my flour mix because it mimics the taste of wheat. If you don't have a flour mill, you can use a coffee grinder and a fine sieve.
        Hope that helps a little .. May your bakery dream come true !

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    24. Hi Ladies
      Have any of you thought of developing a gluten free vinatarta recipe? I can't find one anywhere I have searched and I really would like to try one.
      Colleen

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      1. Colleen, I think if you use my Julie's Flour Blend instead of wheat flour in your favourite vinatarta recipe it should work out well.
        My flour blend is here
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2014/09/julies-flour-blend-gluten-free-and.html

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    25. Hello there, Just a quick question...When making the Fleisch Perishky (meat buns) on page 138, when you add the hot liquid to the flour/yeast mixture, would the hot liquid kill the yeast? Are you supposed to let it cool to room temp? I tried making these today, and I think I maybe killed the yeast by not letting it cool. The dough didn't seem to rise very well. Anyways, I did want to say I love love love the cookbook. I've had it several years now, and purchased it shortly after my mom died. This book has all the familiar things she used to make, and even though I don't make some of the recipes, I love to read them as, they bring back such fond memories. Thanks for keeping the heritage alive.
      Carolyn

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    26. Hello Carolyn,
      Funny, I just made a variation of these today. Instant yeast is quite forgiving when it comes to hot liguids... tap water hot, I'd say. However if the liquids are very hot, they can slow down of kill the yeast. I'd say let it cool down a bit or throw in a few ice cubes. I hope they still worked out for you. I found mine did not rise as much as I thought, but they rose more in the oven and are great. all the best and thank you for your comment.

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    27. Have any of you ladies try to make the real German Brotchen? I lived there for 3 years, that was one thing my husband and I would buy from the bakery, I had ask my landlord to teach me, but she said no one makes them we all buy them. I have not been able to come across any recipe that look right. They were dark hard chewy on the outside, but really airy (with hardly any dough left inside) on the inside. Your all wonderful cooks - just maybe one of you could figure this roll out, I sure do miss it. And they were a roll that was best on the first day. Love your blog. Thanks!

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      1. HI Pam,
        I know exactly which buns you are talking about. That is exactly true what your landlord told you. I visit Germany frequently and we pick those brotchen up at the bakery every morning. We used to have a deli/bakery known as Anita's which carried these Brotchen and they closed down years ago. They are difficult to find unless you find a German delicatessen. Sorry that I can not help you with making this wonderful product. I think some of it has to do with the type of ovens they use? And you are so true...you need them fresh daily. Sorry that I am not able to help you. Marg

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    28. Hello… At one point I made your rolled oats cookies from this link: http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2008/09/rolled-oats-cookies.html That link is no longer working, and I would love to try the recipe again! Thanks!

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      1. Dear anonymous reader,
        We are sorry for your disappointment in not finding the recipe on the blog anymore. Some of our favorite recipes have been removed from the blog and you will find them in our cookbooks of which all royalties go to help children in need of food and/or clean water, This recipe is in the first cookbook. Here is a link on where you can purchase it. .. http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/p/book-purchase.html

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    29. Hello ladies, Please could you post the indgredients in Beau Monde Seasoning, I'm in England and havent seen it here. If I could mix up something similar it would be great.It is always useful to have a substitute listed for your global audience :-) Great blog, and I love any recipes that can ring the changes for our church and group suppers. God bless. Jane from Northumberland England.

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      1. Hi Jane,
        The best we could do it to google it. Here is an example http://whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/beaumonde.htm

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      2. Having said that, someone else will say that the main ingredients are salt, celery and onion . . . if you want to keep it simple, use one part of each. If you use onion and celery salt (as opposed to plain dried), use less salt. Form there you can experiment with herbs/spices that you like.

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      3. Hi Jane, I used to buy the seasoning at our local bulk store, but they no longer carry it. So I googled to see what I could find. I do what Anneliese suggested. Equal amounts of celery salt, and onion powder. I don't add plain salt as that is salty enough. I add about a half teaspoon of sugar. It is pretty close to the one I used to by. I hope you can find those seasoning where you live. Good luck.

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    30. I am new to this site and am interested in following the prayer blog. How inspirational! But I can't seem to bring up anything since sometime in November. Should we be praying for you folks? Of course! we all need an extra touch of love from Father, God! Thank you, Tonia from Oregon

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      1. Hi Tonia. We always appreciate when people join us in praying for the needs of others. Here is a link to the prayer blog where people leave their requests. thank you!
        http://togehterinprayer.blogspot.ca/

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    31. Hello, I would like to ask your permission to post your french bread recipe to my blog? It's in the beginning phase and just starting to type recipes that I think I would like to include on my blog. I will, of course, mention the source of the delicious recipe!

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      1. Hi Shannon, Glad you enjoy the bread and you are welcome to post it with reference back to MGCC. Just this morning, my daughter's friend just told me that her husband makes this bread now. It is always nice to hear from those who are enjoying the recipes. Thank you.

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      2. It is indeed yummy and so easy as well! Thanks again - much appreciated!

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    32. Do you have a gluten-free recipe for the Mennonite yeast bread Zwiebach? I grew up with my grandma making this, but I am now trying to go gluten-free and I can't imagine giving this up!

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      1. Dear S. ... I have been able to produce a pretty satisfactory gf version of most of my favourite Mennonite foods ... but zwieback really need gluten and wheat .... I have not found a way to 'copy-cat' them with any satisfaction. One problem is that to have the 'look' of zweibach with the little bun on top you need a dough that can be stiff enough to hold its shape and if you have your gf dough that stiff it will be very dense and will not rise at all. So... I'll keep trying to do the impossible, but so far I have not succeeded !

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    33. I would like to know if anyone has a recipe for rice crispy treats that is Not made with margarine or butter. I love the taste of butter but they come out rock hard. Then when I use margarine they are soft but margarine is so unhealthy. I tried coconut oil that is very healthy but they also came out rock hard.

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      1. You ask a very good question Maryruth. I have made Rice Krispie Treats many times and have experienced that happen on occasion too. What I have learned is that in order for the Rice Krispie Treats to stay soft the marshmallows, butter and milk should only be barely melted and not brought into any soft boil or simmer. That brings the mixture into a hard candy stage. To keep it soft try to just melt it and take it off the heat before it comes to complete melt and keep stirring until all the marshmallows melt then add the Rice Krispie. Give that a try and see if that makes a difference. Good luck with it. Let us know how that worked out for you.

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      2. I also should point out that it should be done over low heat. It may take a little longer, but that is key I think.

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    34. Hi there. I tried the zweiback recipe and the first time making them they came out pretty good. You could tell they were zweiback. Very mess though for a newbie like me-lol. I think I didn't add enough flour the first time. So I made them again cutting the recipe in half and adding more flour. To the halved recipe I added about 9 1/2 c flour. Kneading it by hand about 7-8 min. They looked wonderful rising! However, as they baked they became one roll ! The top bun congealed with the bottom bun becoming one! I'm so sad. What did I do wrong and how can I do this!!!???? Thank you.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Nancy . . . "turning out pretty good" the first time is very good . . . especially working with such a large recipe . . . and you need not be down on yourself at all! The thing with these large yeast recipes it is very hard to set the exact amount of flour because it depends on the humidity of the day as well as the type of flour. On top of that, here is a difference between Canadian and US wheat/flour. I have found that baking with my daughter in the US, I had to switch things up a bit and it helped when we added gluten. If the dough is on the soft side, the tops can drop into the bottom. As you make them more often, you will find just the right balance in knowing how the dough should feel and you won't worry so much about how many cups . . . next time 9 1/2 cups might be just the right amount, maybe try 10 cups. I'm sure they tasted good even though they looked like buns. Good to hear from you!

        Delete
    35. Not sure if the first question went through...So I will try again, do you have recipes strictly for slow cookers?
      Thanks

      ReplyDelete
    36. Hello John,
      If you type "slow cooker meals " into the recipe search box on the sidebar near the top of the main page, a list will show up and you can click on any of those recipe links.

      ReplyDelete
    37. My beloved Sunbeam Mixmaster age 41 years creamed its last sugar & butter. It is truly a death in the family!! :). I would like to know what type of mixer you use & if possible, a purchase recommendation. Thanks for your time! I love your recipes & especially The Bread. Kathy F

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi Kathy, others may weigh in of course as I can only speak for what I have which is a Braun mixer and not available in Canada (available in Germany) any more unless you can get it on eBay etc. I have family and friends who very happy with the Bosch and my daughter uses a Kitchen Aid. If you get a Kitchen Aid, get one with a large size bowl to do larger Yeast doughs, if you like doing breads. I think the Kitchen Aid may be quite comparable to the Sunbeam Mixmaster. You could always get a new Sunbeam. It's done you well and you are familiar with how it works!

        Delete
      2. Kathy, I have the Kitchen Aid Machine (professional series) and I like it. It is good good for making bread, cookies etc. I find that this particular size is good it is larger than the regular Kitchen Aid which is nice if you bake a lot at a time. My friends who have the Bosch tell me that it can a larger amount of dough if you are making bread than the Kitchen Aid I have. My machine can only knead dough from 4 cups of liquid. Not sure about the Bosch capacity.

        Delete
    38. I live in Canada and I just ordered a Twine & Scissors holder from Crate & Barrel from your May 30th entry. I will think of your site always, as I use it. Thank you for including where you get things from, so that we can order them as well up here. Thank you for all of the hard work you put into your site, and for sharing all of your recipes and ideas with all of us. I look at your site every single morning first thing. Thank you for making all of my mornings brighter and happier. God bless all of you girls, for working to make others' lives happy and easier. Cathy from Canada.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi Cathy, thank you very much for your kind feedback! Messages such as yours are so encouraging - all we can say is you have blessed us now as well. And just so you know, most of us live in Canada too!

        Delete
    39. Greetings from an avid fan in Nova Scotia! Any plans to include nutritional information for the recipes? It would be hugely helpful for those of us with specific dietary issues. Thanks so much! MJ

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello MJ . . . we are sorry to say that none of us has the qualifications to narrow down the nutritional science/value in our recipes as suggested by several others already. It is possible to google a recipe and get a good idea, but that would be quite time consuming, on top of photography and cooking each recipe. If there are recipes you are particularly interested in , we could suggest you try a calorie counter site such as
        http://www.caloriecount.com/cc/recipe_analysis.php
        where you can copy and paste the recipe ingredients (without any bullet points) and get the nutritional facts chart. You would need to type in the number it serves and be sure the ingredients are correctly specified. I hope this helps.

        Delete
    40. Hello from Oklahoma,
      I was looking for the page to make a prayer request and this is what I found. My niece, Mckenzie Field who lives in Syracuse, NY needs a heart transplant. She is 36 yrs old with 5 kids. Please add her to your prayer list. Thank You Ann Cross

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Ann, Thank you for contacting us. Julie has also published your request on the prayer blog http://togehterinprayer.blogspot.ca/2015/03/this-is-real-love.html#comment-form . . . you can find "request prayer" on the top bar on the main page.

        Dear Lord, I pray for Mckenzie, a young mother who needs a heart transplant. I can't even imagine what she faces, and the fears and concerns and dread that haunt her....but you do. You know every detail of her life, and she was fearfully and wonderfully made. It is an easy thing for you to touch her and give her a new heart, making surgery unnecessary. If you choose to heal her through the skill and knowledge you have given the doctors and surgeons, then I pray that the perfect heart will come available and that the whole procedure will go more smoothly than could be hoped for. Bless Mckenzie, cover her with your love, give her that indescribable peace and may she know that you care for her children more than she does and you know how they need a mother's love. Hover over this family and may your perfect will be done. In Jesus' name, I pray .. amen

        Delete
    41. I just wanted to say thank you for creating this blog..I love the culmination of tradition and care that went in every recipe...it sounds like you ladies have a storm cooking up the kitchen together. Many Blessings to you all!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. What can we say but thank you for taking the time to comment! It is very much appreciated! God bless you too!

        Delete
    42. We made the banana bread recipe today and it was fantastic. My dad said it was the best he has ever eaten Next up I will be trying the hot dog relish. Looks yummy! Thanks so much! I'll be buying the cookbook and looking forward to many more wonderful recipes.

      ReplyDelete
    43. I have a question, I'm looking for a specific recipe. A few years back my dad helped with clean up in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Where they were staying had a large Mennonite group down there helping, the men were working and the ladies did the cooking. He keeps talking about this breakfast casserole they had but all he remembers was that it had a french toast like bottom and it had eggs. Can you help me pinpoint this recipe? He fell in love with it and still talks about it years later and I'd love to be able to make it for him.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Dawn,
        That sounds like quite a memorable experience and opportunity to help out! We really have no idea what the dish may be exactly, but it sounds like what is known as "wife saver" casserole, which is not necessarily a Mennonite dish. Without further memory of what was in it, such as maybe ham, it is hard to know, but here is a recipe that may help ...
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2015/01/oven-baked-strata.html

        All the best!

        Delete
    44. Hi Ladies.
      do you have a white bread recipe that I can put in the refrigerator overnight and bake in the morning. Love the recipes you put out. Thank you :)

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Maria, I have not refrigerated bread dough, but I know others have done so with success. Judy, has refrigerated the French Bread dough posted here
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2008/07/french-bread.html She says she lets it rise once...then puts it in sealed container or plastic bag in fridge overnight. Forms into loaves the next day. Lets it rise and bakes it as usual. I think you could try putting any bread dough in the fridge, covered with enough room to rise, form it and let it rise in the pans in the morning before baking.

        Delete
    45. I am scared that my turkey isn't big enough to feed everyone, can I cook 2 extra separate turkey breasts that I buy separately, in with the whole turkey? Would I put them inside the cavity? or lay them on top, or would this work. Thank you, and Happy Thanksgiving! Cathy

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi Cathy, It would be great to do some turkey breast alongside your turkey. Don't put it inside the cavity. Put it beside the turkey but check it occasionally because it will be done before a whole turkey. Remove it and keep them warm while the turkey finishes. Have a happy thanksgiving.

        Delete
    46. I love your website! I look at it every day and like the fact that it is good home cooking. I used some of your Cooking for a crowd recipes this summer for lawn bowling tournaments and was a little concerned as I always try recipes first before I try them on anyone else. I had nothing but compliments on the roast beef and chicken recipes. A lot of out of towners asked me for the recipes and gave them your website.

      ReplyDelete
    47. I am so inspired by your wonderful site....spiritually as well as physically. I recently discovered Charlotte 's lebkuchen recipe and would like to ask if the cookies are ever cut into shapes? I have a vintage cookie cutter of a santa with diecut German papers and instructions to use with a lebkuchen recipe but am not sure if this particular recipe would work. Thank you so much for your time.
      Sally

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I am sorry for the delay in responding to your question, I was away from the computer for a few days. Thank you for the affirmation on our blog, I am so glad you enjoy it. Regarding the Lebkuchen. I don't see why the vintage cookie cutters wouldn't work with this recipe. The only thing that could happen for the definition of the cutter not to be seen is that the cookie may rise too much. If it works please email a picture to us at crpennser@gmail.com or post it on our Facebook Page. I would love to see your results.

        Delete
    48. do you have a gluten free, dairy free stollen recipe?
      aldi's store has almond, marzipan, or cherry stollen this time of year and i cannot eat any of it.
      hope you have a receipt for it.
      thanks

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Deborah, I have not made gf Stollen ... but I did a quick google search and found this site that had a recipe that sounds like a winner .. http://www.tastyeatsathome.com/?s=Stollen I think for next Christmas I'll work out my own gf recipe - I used to make it, and enjoy it, before I was Celiac.

        Delete
    49. Do you have a Gluten Free version of your recipe for "Mom's soft white cookies"?
      Thank you,
      Rose

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi Rose, I have not made the soft white cookies - I think you are referring to Betty's recipe http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2008/06/moms-soft-white-cookies.html
        My husband is not a "Cookie Monster" so I don't often make cookies although I love them. To make Betty's cookie recipe I would suggest that you try it cutting the recipe in half (at least with first attempt) use either Julie's Flour Mix for the flour or use a commercial gf all-purpose mix. You will probably need a little less flour than the recipe calls for and add 1/2 tsp. (or less) xanthan gum for each cup of flour used. And use sweet rice flour for handling the dough. Keep the dough as soft as you can, or the cookies won't rise - rolling on parchment paper.. and covering the dough with plastic wrap can really make it easier. Hope that helps ! julie

        Delete
    50. Hi Ladies,
      I would love to teach my daughter how to make warenicki, so I am looking for a GF recipe. Any advice or is there just no way?
      Thanks!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Yes, you can make gluten free Warenki! Julie has a recipe in our first cookbook, Mennonite Girls Can Cook.
        I hope it's readily available for you.

        Delete
    51. I stumbled onto you site looking for a pot roast recipe. I found your Roast Beef for a Crowd recipe. I'm going to us it for lunch for 80 at a local homeless shelter on Monday. Thank you for you web site and the wonderful recipes.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thank you! Wishing you all the best as you prepare and serve. God bless you.

        Delete
    52. Dawn from New Brunswick CanadaJanuary 15, 2016 at 7:15 AM

      I have been making your cabbage roll soup (I believe it's Kathy's recipe) for the last year and absolutely love it! My husband has never been much for soups but he loves this. Thank you for sharing it and God Bless!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thank you, Dawn! Always nice to hear these kind of comments.

        Delete
    53. Trying to get the recipe for Omas soft white cookies by Charlotte. It doesn't come up..says the blog for this post doesn't exist..can I somehow still get this recipe.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I just typed it in the recipe search and it came up for me. It is there, try again and if you still can't find it here is the link. You can copy and paste it into your browser.
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2015/12/omas-soft-cream-cookies.html

        Delete
    54. Replies
      1. Near the top of the blog side bar is a recipe search engine. If you type in the name of a recipe it will come up. Here it is to copy and paste ... http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2011/02/french-onion-soup.html
        Thank you for your visit.

        Delete
    55. Hello to all you wonderful cooks & thank you for your fantastic recipes :)
      I was wondering...if you were hosting an afternoon tea for approximately 100 guests (ladies & gents) what would you serve as a menu & what quantities.....how many varieties & how much of each & how much do I allow per guest....does any of that make sense?? :) oh & as it would be my birthday & at my home I would need most of it make/prep before.
      I would appreciate any advice you could give,
      Many thanks & God Bless,
      Robyn

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello Sugar Pie,
        We were together with friends last night and someone said, the hardest part in planning an event is planning the food, not making it. I had to agree. To be honest, it is hard to even advise on this as it involves personal preferences on taste and what you feel you are able to do. It also depends what time of day it is. An afternoon tea is not a time when you have to feel like people are expecting to fill up like at a dinner, so that makes that easier. But if it's early afternoon, guests may have skipped lunch. So many variables, but I would focus on finger food appetizers and small sweets. You could click on the appetizer section on the side bar and choose according to your taste and then on the cookies and bars. For more fancy than that, maybe small tarts and cream puffs would be good. Appetizers such as Mexican spirals can be frozen, while little sandwiches can be made a day ahead and kept moist with a damp paper towel over them in a container with a lid. Tarts can be purchased, baked and filled the day before and kept refrigerated... in a separate fridge if you have it. I would fill in with lots of veggies and fruit to nibble on. As to how much to make, maybe think about how much you would eat yourself (like three appies and two desserts? Maybe 5 appies and 3 desserts for men?) So, for example, that would be 50 x 2 plus 50 x 3 desserts for 100 men and women. I would suggest to have someone in the kitchen to make sure platters and punch get refilled so that you can relax and visit with guests, rather than check the food. Happy Birthday!

        Delete
    56. Thank you Anneliese :)
      I had thought something along those lines but it's always nice to have confirmation of some sort :)
      Thanks again & God Bless, I certainly will be looking at all your recipes....Thank you for sharing xx

      ReplyDelete
    57. just made your corn/cheese biscuits. bypassed the rolling out and just scooped the mix into muffin pans. yes i'm lazy but they were still deelish.

      ReplyDelete
    58. I would find it extremely helpful to know how many servings I can expect from a recipe. Thank you.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thank you for your input. We will make a more concentrated effort to specify the approximate number of servings.

        Delete
    59. I wish to add a recipe from my mennonite Heritage. I come from the Russian Mennonites that settled in southern Manitoba, Canada. My mother made a delicious paska spread that is different than the one you have on the website. Here is the recipe.

      Paska Spread ~ Sylvia Klassen

      Russian Mennonite heritage (ie like my mom use to make)

      Ingredients

      • 2 cups cottage cheese, pushed through a sieve
      • yolks of 4-5 boiled eggs, also pushed through the sieve
      • ½ cup heavy cream
      • ½ cup butter, softened
      • ½ cup sugar
      • ½ teaspoon grated lemon zest
      • 1½ teaspoons lemon juice

      Preparation

      Mix all ingredients together and cool in fridge till firm.

      Store in refrigerator (up to 2 weeks) or freeze.

      Spread on Paska bread slices and enjoy.

      Note: I have bad wrists so I put everything into my blender or large bullet and blend it together (instead of the sieve).

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thank you, Sylvia!
        I considered posting your recipe on the blog but noticed that it is very much like two that we already have with a slightly different method, if you put it in the blender. Here are two for comparison's sake. The first is a much larger recipe, but also an original Russian Paska spread.
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2009/04/seerney-paska-for-kulichpaska-cheese.html
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2010/03/hildas-glums-paska-spread.html

        Delete
    60. Hello would you consider making another Mennonite staple cookbook? I love the Mennonite cookbook. I notices you left out some staples.you have such great tuterals that I feel confident using grandma recipes. My mom didn't like to cook so she didn't teach me so much.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thank you so much for your comment! We have often said, had we known how the cookbook would be appreciated, we would have focused only on Mennonite Dishes in that first book. Now we are not sure if the recipes that are missing would warrant another whole book. It would be fun to try and something to think about.

        Delete
      2. I think ther would be enough recipes :-).begging? :-).yes.Google"'Germans from Russia heritage collection'"they have a lot of cookbooks for the recipes but not with pictures. :-(

        Delete
      3. Dear Anneliese - about a possible #3.....I vote a resounding yes - and I have a suggestion. Would you consider a book that expands on the concept of faspa? and hospitality in general? I know you have shared about those things already, but I would love to read and use and refer and learn from you all on those two subjects. Bev's post on her husband's birthday party faspa was such a treat. I think the pictures were part of that, definitely. Even without pictures, though, I could just imagine those teenage boys cruising the town scouting for zwieback:) Anyways, thank you - all of you - for your labors of love. I'm feelin' it:) and I would love to see and share a #3.

        Delete
    61. Hi what's the difference from creamed cottage cheese to dry cottage cheese?I'm not familiar with the creamed

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. As far as I can tell, creamed cottage cheese has cream added to it. It has curds sitting in liquid (milk or cream) I use it in lasagna. Dry cottage cheese has a dry and crumbly texture, used as filler in perogies etc. Some replace dry cottage cheese with or refer to it as farmers cheese.

        Delete
    62. At one time you had an advertisement on your sight for custom made swings. Could you please let me know the name of the company? Thank you, Lori

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hi,
        At this time Rosedale Swings is no longer in production.
        If you send me your info contact, (email) I can put you in touch with her.
        She's working on a project for me right now.
        Hopefully she can help you with your request.
        margbartel13@gmail.com
        Marg.

        Delete
      2. Hi,
        I have chatted today to the owner of the Rosedale Swing Company and she suggested that you email her.
        mykajelier@gmail.com
        I'm hoping you can make contact with her as she would be willing to help you.
        Marg

        Delete
    63. I have used the G.F. recipe pie crust since 2011 because your crust is EXCELLENT!!!
      Thank you so much,you have made my family so happy,you will never know ... Thank you again,
      Denise Denis from Cornwall ontario Canada

      ReplyDelete
    64. HELP! My home-made frozen Wareniki thawed and refroze together in a clump! What can I do with them now? Any ideas on how to save my precious filled dough pockets would be much appreciated.
      Thank-you, L.Wiebe

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. The only thing I can think of is to cut through it crosswise and layer it in a casserole dish with the sauce (like lasagna) and bake it until the pastry is cooked. You may need quite a bit of sauce.

        Delete
    65. Hi I Baked the Peppernut Buns this week, I was suprised how dark the inside was, I remembered them lighter, I also notice my spread out more than rising, I gave them room on the pan but they ended up together. I dipped in sugar but the sugar melted before baking them , any suggestions ?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I am not sure what happened with your dough. Maybe a little more flour was needed? I have baked these buns frequently and have not had a problem. If you find the buns darker than you would like on the inside you could reduce the amount of spices. We like these buns spicy but not everyone does:)
        I am confused when you say you dipped them in sugar before you baked them. I bake them first, let cool, then ice and put sprinkles on top.

        Delete
    66. Hi Terrence, I can't speak about why your dough is dark on the inside, but I may offer some insight as to why your sugar melted. My aunt always placed her peppernut buns close together so they would have soft sides when she baked them which is a personal preference. Then after the buns had risen she would lightly brush the buns with cream and top them with course sugar (always had to be pink sugar of course ;) ) just before she baked them, the sugar never melted. I have made her recipe a couple of times and using the course sugar and just a light brush of cream I did not have the sugar melt. I hope this helps.

      ReplyDelete
    67. Dear Ladies:
      I just love your blog and thank you for taking the time out to work so hard to make it lovely for all of us to enjoy. In fact, I have added y'all to my side bar so other ladies, who stop by my site, can visit yours too. :)
      Thank you and blessings!
      Mrs. B

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thank you, Mrs B! God's blessings on you too!

        Delete
    68. I love your website, every recipe is amazing !

      ReplyDelete
    69. After a recent round of Mennonite cooking, I sent a photo of my daughters making roll kuchen to my Mom who replied '(Even very very young) Mennonite Girls Can Cook!', which inspired a blog post. http://www.pinkbears.ca/index.php/item/567-even-very-very-young-mennonite-girls-can-cook It links heavily to your website, so I hope you don't mind the obviously plagiarized post name. I'd love your feedback, if you wished - or possibly even a link from your site? Thanks! www.pinkbears.ca, onpinkbears@gmail.com

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. So true! Thank you for sharing this with us!

        Delete
    70. I was reading that you can make transparent apple pie filling and then freeze...is there a special recipe to follow for this procedure? I was just given a big bag of transparent apples and need to make use of them.
      Thank you.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. There are various things you can do. You can slice the apples, soak in slightly salted water, drain, towel dab to dry, and freeze on cookie sheets, then remore to zip lock bags. http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2008/10/freezing-apples.html - frozen apples can be used in whatever way you like later. Check out this site too http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2008/09/apple-pie.html

        You can also prepare the filling as shown here http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2013/09/omas-apple-pie-filling-recipe.html and freeze it in pie size portions. Some line a few (foil) pie plates with saran wrap, fill, cover and freeze. After they are frozen you can remove from shells and stack, ready to go. They do not need to thaw before inserting into pie plates lined with crust.
        Personally, I like to prepare whole pies, freeze them and bake them from frozen when needed. It can seem a daunting task... but give yourself a day and you will find you still have half the day to relax. Hope this helps.

        Delete
    71. I had a question I was hoping you could help me with. I made brandied cherries last year, and I think I would be more inclined to use them if they were dried, in cakes and bread and such.....do you think it Is safe for me to pull them out of their jars and dehydrate them in my dyer?

      ReplyDelete
    72. OKAY LADIES, I am turning to the experts here. I want to can chicken breast, but don't have a pressure cooker. Any ideas? I know the old timers didn't have those fancy kitchen gadgets.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Maybe we are not such experts, as we do not can chicken, at least not without a pressure canner. From all that I've seen online, it is too dangerous not to use a pressure canner, because boiling point does not bring the temperature to a point that botulism spores die, where as pressure canner temp does.
        You could look for a pressure canner in a second hand store, just to be safe in using the correct method.

        Delete
    73. Hello Ladies!

      Thank you so much for this wonderful site and the Mennonite Girls Can Cook cookbook - I love them both! In my house, that book gets put to use several times a week and it is already a very special book to my young family. I have a two year old daughter who absolutely loves looking at the pictures and choosing something to make. If I can't find the cookbook in the kitchen, I'll be sure to find it in my daughter's room. My husband (who is Mennonite from the Altona-area in Manitoba) has loved every recipe I've made from the book. Having grown up in southern Manitoba myself, my Mennonite recipes consisted of only vareniki, farmer sausage and schmaundt fat but that is no longer the case thanks to you ladies!

      I'm so grateful for the book because while I am not Mennonite, it enables me to serve Mennonite food to my daughter, who otherwise would not have had much opportunity to get to know and love the food of her heritage.

      Thank you so much!

      Much love,

      The Brauns

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. You are so welcome and we thank you! God bless!

        Delete
    74. Hi there , love your site , I have been looking for a cookie recipe my MIL used to make , she called them New Years cookies, they were cresent shaped and filled with something I'm not sure what, maybe jam ??? , they were brown and soft. I once asked for the recipe and she told me I would never be able to make them ..... so I never asked again . I'm hoping one of you girls will know the cookie I'm talking about. Thanks

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Sharon, I had to laugh at her response, because she may have known that these types of cookies are a labor of love. I thought we had a recipe on the blog, but it is in the first cookbook, Mennonite Girls Can Cook, pg 182. If you can find Rogers Golden syrup and baking ammonia and willing to roll, cut, fill and pinch, you are set! These cookies have a glaze on them that keeps them for a long time without freezing. Maybe your mil did not glaze them? They are very good! I'm sorry we don't publish recipes on the blog that are in our cookbooks, but hopefully you can get a hold of one.

        Delete
      2. I just realized this recipe may work for you.
        http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2008/11/christmas-brown-jam-cookies-regular-and.html

        Delete
    75. Thank you for sharing your wonderful recipes. I admire the work that you do. I make sure that I attribute all the recipes that I copy to you.
      Blessings to all of you,
      Betty Lee in San Antonio, Texas

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thank you, Betty Lee. Blessings to you!

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    76. Thank you so much for your books and your blog site here. It is a cold afternoon so I have just returned to reading more of the meditations and recipes in "Bread for the Journey". A while back when I was looking for a gift for my sister and a friend who had significant birthdays I purchased your special book "Celebrations"..they told me they loved the inspiring thoughts, recipes and photos. I was so glad to find a unique gift that i had also enjoyed reading the same day I purchased a copy for myself. I am not of Mennonite Heritage but many of my friends are included in that group so I have enjoyed many of the recipes featured in your books and blog. I have also experienced Mennonite hospitality and God's love from my friend's mother who has passed away now. She was a wonderful example of living her Christian faith in her home and welcomed everyone to her table. My friend (her daughter) and I often dropped in late in the day after a day out and we were always welcomed with delicious homemade noodle soup, home made Zwieback, fruit soup and more. I cherish those memories of a lovely lady in her late 80's at the time. A specific example of her hospitality was one winter when we picked up a teacher exchange family at the Vancouver Airport on a snowy day...we were driving home to Chilliwack when we discovered the freeway was closed at Abbotsford and all hotels were filled. What were we to do we wondered? Suddenly something told me that we would be welcomed at the door of this wonderful lady..our guests were surprised that we were going to her door unannounced..no cell phones! We were warmly invited in out of the storm and soon there was a dinner on the table and beds for 6! Breakfast was graciously served in the morning and the highway was open so we were soon on our way. It is a night that I will never forget and a wonderful example of living the Christian life by extending hospitality to my family and people she did not know. That wonderful lady is now in heaven after a long life well-lived by practising God's example. She nourished our guests from another country with "bread for their year's journey" in Canada. I realize this message is not a comment or a question on a recipe but a story that I have often told over the years. P.S. My father's side of our family emigrated from Germany in 1857 so I do feel some connection to a German heritage and enjoy trying many of your recipes! Thank you so much!

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      1. Thank you so much for taking the time to write and tell us your story! We sure appreciate the stories that connect us in this way. What a dear friend you had in your friend's mom. May we all live to leave such a legacy of love and care. God bless you.

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    77. Hi Anneliesse-
      I've just found your website, and I think we must be from the same people!
      My mother's family was part of a community of German farmers who came from Beatrice, NE to Louisiana as part of a rice farming grange. I came here by way of a recipe search for what we called 'Portzechen.' (your Portselky)
      I've been on a search to find out more about my mother's family. Do you have any information about the Mennonite community in NE? Are their any books about them? My mother was Abrahams, her mother was Tiahrt/von Riesen, and her mother was Wiebe, and their neighbors were Friesen. I'd appreciate any information you have. My mom passed away after 12 years with Alzheimer's, and my cousins and I are searching for our history.
      We also have an inordinate amount of pastors and pastor's wives in our family, (I am a pastor's wife) and I am wondering about our faith history too.
      I have vague memories of my grandparents teasing each other about high and low German, so your website is pulling some puzzle pieces together for me.
      Thank you so much for your work here. It is clearly a labor of love. Thank you for entertaining my questions!
      Sincerely,
      Catherine Regen

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      1. Hello Catherine,
        It is interesting how family names and food become a way of connecting our past, even if it's been 150 years since our ancestors lived in the same colony, namely the Molotschna. I looked up some intormation on line that might interest you as to why and when your Mennonite ancestors came to Nebraska. Even though my ancestors did not go the same route, we came from the same place in Russia/Ukraine. Many came directly to Canada in the early 1900's. My grandmother only came out with the German army and then went to South America. Our family came to Canada in 1967. We have some of our history on the website http://foreverythingaseason.blogspot.ca/2009/09/why-do-so-many-mennonites-come-from.html. I have more on my personal blog, but I think you want to know about your family and I would think that checking out the museum in Henderson would give you a lot of information.
        https://hendersonheritage.wordpress.com/history/mennonite-history/
        http://www.hendersonnebraska.com/play-in-henderson/history/
        There is also some information about the Mennonite church established in Beatrice when the Mennonites came from Prussia. You could possibly find information there.
        http://gameo.org/index.php?title=First_Mennonite_Church_(Beatrice,_Nebraska,_USA)

        So nice to connect! I hope this helps.

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      2. Thank you so much for the information, Anneliese. I look forward to sharing these links with my family. Both food and family have very strong ties!

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    78. Hi Ladies - we want to help our non-mennonite congregants learn about paska (and try making it!) and would like to post a picture of your paska and share your recipes (regular & GF) and wondering if that's permissible?
      Thanks!
      Kelly

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    79. Hi Kelly,
      We are happy to have you use/print these recipes for your use. Please give credit back to this blog.

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      1. Absolutely will do. Thanks so much! :)

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    80. Check your site every day for great recipes and excellent, uplifting and thought-provoking comments, Bread for the Journey.

      Quick question.....didn't it used to be possible to print the recipes? I can find no way to do that now. Is there a secret button???

      Thank you for your work here!

      ---Gretchen

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      1. Thank you, Gretchen! If you click on the comments, there is a PRINT button on the left - on the blue bar under the recipe.

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      2. Thank you, Anneliese!

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    81. Absolutely one of my favorite websites EVER! I come back here time and time again....
      Even though I have some of your cookbooks...I love the website....it is the greatest.
      I'm so glad a neighbor lady (Emmy Martens related to Marg Bartel) told me about it a few years ago and I checked it out...and then I told my sister in law and niece in Northern Ireland about it and my nieces' husband owns a Christian bookstore in Northern Ireland and he ordered some of the cookbooks in to the shop...in Newtownards NI
      It is really a great place to visit and come back to .....thanks for the great job you have done

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      1. Thank you for taking the time to write this kind note, Arly! You are so welcome! We wish your niece and nephew in Ireland God's blesings on their business!

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    82. Hello I'm interested in buying a spätzle maker and nobody I know carries it.is there a store that would ship?

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      1. Hello, if you live in Canada, you can check Hudson's
        Bay or Bed, Bath & Beyond. You may have to order it.
        You can also order it from amazon.com or amazon.ca
        https://www.amazon.com/Norpro-3128-Spaetzle-Maker/dp/B00004UE89
        https://www.bedbathandbeyond.ca/store/product/spaetzle-noodle-dumpling-maker/1010317169

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    83. I love your Christ-filled approach to home, family and cooking!
      Why is there no longer Saturday post?
      Thank you

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      1. Amy, thank you for your encouraging words and also for noticing the missing Saturday posts. We also miss not having a new post up, however, just four days off a month gives us a bit of a break in the overall scheme of planning, preparing and picture taking and we just felt ready to take this little break. We do appreciate your visits.

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    84. I would really love more canning recipes.

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      1. Not sure if you have had a chance to look through what we have posted, there are a number of options there. We will continue to try our best to share what we cook in our kitchens.
        http://mennonitegirlscancookcanning.blogspot.ca/

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    85. Do any of you have a profile on Plan To Eat (www.plantoeat.com)? If so, I would love to "friend" you to be able to add all of these wonderful recipes into the recipes available to me. If not, no worries, I can link to the ones that most intrigue me. Thank you!

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    86. Judy's peaches and chicken Naan. Judy, what is the name of the tea room in Victoria where you had this please. I live here and would love to visit there. Barb.

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      1. The tea room is called The White Heather Tea Room in Oak Bay. It was lovely!

        Sorry for the delayed response, Barb. I was on vacation when the question came and then totally forgot about it.

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    87. Thank you for this God glorifying blog! It is a little haven of peace and beauty and gives me hope.

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      1. Thank you and may God bless and strengthen you!

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    88. I'm wondering if any of you girls have a good cherry jam recipe? I was hoping to make some from my frozen cherries now that the gardening/canning season is mostly over, but don't see any recipes on your site.

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      1. Sorry, it doesn't look like anyone has. If your cherries are pitted most of the work is done. I would make it very much like a berry jam, following the directions on the pectin box. I like to use Certo Light.

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    89. Hello
      Is there a listing of the recipes in MGCC "CELEBRATIONS" available?
      What is the tar pictured on the front cover?

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      Replies
      1. Gary, If you look on amazon at the option to see inside the book and page through to the end, there is an index that you can see. As for the tar you are seeing, I'm sorry I am not sure what you are referring to.

        https://www.amazon.ca/Mennonite-Girls-Can-Cook-Celebrations/dp/0836196759/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1508179155&sr=8-1&keywords=celebrations+mennonite+girls+can+cook

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    90. Life in our community has left a new comment on your post:

      My name is JaLynn West and my grandmother was Ruby Suderman Schlichting. She grew up in Hillsboro, Kansas as a German Mennonite whose family migrated from Russia. She later moved to Midland Texas. I want to share her recipes but they are a bit sketchy. I found your blog through Pinterest and would like to use your Zweiback recipe and give you credit, sharing a link to your blog if you'll let me. I love the way you blend your faith and love of cooking, so much like my grandmother did. Have a blessed day!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Hello, JaLynn, I took the liberty to delete your phone number and post your question in hopes that you check back here. We are always happy for others to share our recipes, giving credit and link to Mennonite Girls Can Cook. Thank you for sharing your story.

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    91. Thank you for the butter tart recipe. I lost my mom's recipe and came to your site first because it's a Mennonite site. My mom's family The Eby family was one of the first families to immigrate and start communities in Pennsylvania. They later moved up to Kitchener in Ontario Canada and founded a town. Her recipes are handed down and are special to me. I was so upset I didn't know how to make her butter tarts until I found your site. Thank you

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      1. You are welcome! We hope they are just like your mom's.

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    92. I just want to thank you all for a year filled with , not just great recipes, but food for the spirit as well. Your "Bread For The Journey", is a lovely way to start my Sunday mornings. I appreciate the personal views, stories and scripture quotes more than you will even know. To my sisters in Christ, thank you and Merry Christmas. Gail

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      1. Thank you for your kind note, Gail! Wishing you a merry Christmas, likewise. May you be know God's daily care and blessings

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    93. Do you know of anywhere in Chilliwack to buy the curing salt? Thanks

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      Replies
      1. It looks like the only place we can direct you to now is amazon.ca or amazon.com Here is one link https://www.amazon.com/Medley-Hills-Farm-Prague-Powder/dp/B00WIB1MTM/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_325_lp_t_3?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=6YDG955PB18TD5THNA43

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      2. Stuffers in Langley has curing salt. www.stuffers.com

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    94. I have a question - what is the key to making nice soft, round buns - mine are sometimes and sometimes not!

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      1. Hello Ruth! Along with doing everything right, there seems to be some science involved with the amount of humidity of the day but adding an egg and some mashed potatoes, using water for lightness and not overdoing the flour amount can all play a part in making them soft. Pinching them off and then pushing them through your thumb and forefinger a second time can help in shaping them nice and round. If they don't turn out exactly as you like, blame the humidity. =)

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    95. Is there a possibility to add a search category so one can search for a recipe? This is time consuming the way the index is now.

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    96. Irene, there is a recipe search button under the video on the right side bar. It helps if you know the exact name of the recipe, but it will also come up with several options and you have to scroll through them.

      ReplyDelete
    97. Hi - I made the english muffin recipe but I had a few questions. First of all does it matter if you use regular yeast or should you use quick rise? Also, I don't use my stand mixer to knead, but this time I did as that what it looked like in the picture, so how to tell when kneaded enough? I used 2 cast iron frying pans and I found that I was having trouble cooking them - some were almost burnt, and the others took a lot longer to cook (two burners, and I kept turning 1 down and the other up). So, I found that none cooked properly, but I just finished them in the oven. Do you use a 2" cutter or 3"? they seemed quite small with a 2". Can you reroll the scraps?
      These were very tasty - my husband told me not to buy them anymore! I liked the whole wheat and the honey in them.

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    98. Hi Shelley..yes use the quick rise yeast.
      I kneaded my dough for approx 4 minutes, the dough was still a bit sticky but that's okay.
      I have not used cast iron pans, I find that an electric grill works best.
      I used a 2" cutter. You can use a 3" if you want them a little larger.
      I don't re-roll the scraps although you can. I make a loaf of english bread instead.
      I'm happy you liked them. I do prefer them to the bought ones as well.
      I hope this info helps.

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    99. you are right, they can . i was raised in a mennonite family. rull cookins perschie verenika rear egg etc. different words now ?? my wife , not menno , but eukranian, french , makes the best perrogis and cabbage rolls on the planet. her grampas recipe for dough and the best potato and cheese filling ever. sometimes she will let me help to use her dough with my favourite , cottage cheese that i remember as glums verenika with white sauce , and sometimes fruit filling

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    100. Hey ladies! Wondering if you can do my a favor. I have been linking to your http://mennonitegirlscancook.blogspot.com/2009/06/baked-oatmeal.html for the 8 years, wondering if you could upgrade the Wilderness Edge text to an actual link of our homepage wildernessedge.com Thanks so much. We are hoping to grow our back links! Blessings. Kevin

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      Replies
      1. Should be good to go now. Thank you for linking us.

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    101. It is a wonderful recipe, we have had success with a recipe that contained ground almonds but this was just as good if not better. My son is also allergic to almonds and eggs. I used your recipe with ground chia seeds as a substitute for eggs (1 tab and 3 tab of water for every egg substitute) So we did one batch for my daughter and one for my son, added more orange peel and lemon oil. I never felt the need to gush but you girls really can cook. Bless your hands and thanks for all your work!!!!!

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    102. The button that deletes photos when printing a recipe has disappeared. Also the button to choose the print size. Can these be put back on the "print" recipe page?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Jut want to assure you that nothing has been deleted. It could be that the print program has changed the format in how it looks on your computer. If you look along the top of the PRINT page, there should be an icon of a mountain or a house - if you click on that you can choose your size photo. Then there is an icon for the print size right beside it too, it has a capital T and an arrow.

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    103. Please help me find my favoutite hotcakes recipe .It may be called Grandma hodders hotcakes or similar .Cant find it anywhere and its from this site

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. You almost had it - Grandma Harder's Griddle Cakes http://www.mennonitegirlscancook.ca/2014/06/grandma-harders-griddle-cakes.html

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